business psychology, Company Culture, Danny Gattas, Employee Engagement, Employment, Engagement, Event, Uncategorized

Culture is Merriam-Webster’s Word of the Year – For Good Reason


Largely due to its tracking of which words were looked up the most, Merriam-Webster announced “Culture” as its Word of the Year for 2014. Chosen at the end of each year, the word serves as aCulture-resized snapshot of what people have been thinking about and talking about for the past 12 months, and what will
continue to be a hot topic in the coming year. (While “Culture” had one of the largest spikes in look-ups, the words “Celebrity Culture,” “Pop Culture,” “NFL Culture,” “Media Culture” and “Company Culture” also had big years.) And from what I’ve experienced consulting with organizations across the country, thankfully, we can expect to continue focusing on culture in 2016 and beyond.

“Culture is a word that we seem to be relying on more and more. It allows us to identify and isolate an idea, issue, or group with seriousness,” said Peter Sokolowski, editor-at-large for Merriam-Webster, elaborating, “And it’s efficient: we talk about the ‘culture’ of a group rather than saying ‘the typical habits, attitudes, and behaviors’ of that group.”

I am sure that most experts on Employee Engagement were not surprised by Merriam-Webster’s choice.

Legendary management expert Peter Drucker was one of the first to get it right years ago when he coined the phrase “Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast.”

Interviewing for Cultural Fit – Case Study: Google
Determining cultural fit in the interview process can be extremely challenging. When organizations are very large, it can be especially difficult to define what qualities make candidates mesh with a culture of thousands of people who are, essentially, quite different.

When Google started growing at an exponential rate, its Senior Leadership had a “stroke of genius,” according to Russ Laraway, Director of Media and Platforms: they decided to define what it means to be “Googley.” By articulating this concept, it became much easier to assess whether candidates would thrive in Google’s environment.

The definition of being “Googley” includes: Thinking Big, Having a Bias for Action, Being a Good Communicator, and the Ability to Work at a Face Pace in Small Teams.

By specifically defining what type of employees they were looking for, Google was able to attract the right candidates and build an extremely strong corporate culture. Laraway discovered, “We began hiring people who were often more Googley than we were!”

The company grew from 2,500 to 25,000 employees in only six years, Google’s unique culture flourished, building one of the most well-known Magnetic Cultures around the world.

Call to Action #1: Revisit your definition of the perfect person you are trying to hire and carefully interview for these characteristics.

Character versus Skill
Of course a candidate having both excellent character and skills is ideal, but sometimes people fall a little short on one end. Which aspect is a better compromise? Do you hire the person who has years of experience executing the job duties, but seems slightly off in regards to cultural fit? Or do you hire the person whom everyone on the team loves, but will need some additional training to improve his or her skill set?

I would take the person with the right character any day of the week. Character is ingrained in a person’s core being and dictates how he or she will behave. It encompasses one’s ethics, values, dedication, motivation, and outlook. It is nearly impossible to alter a person’s character, for better or for worse. Skills are things that are learned. If a person has everything you are looking for as a potential employee, but he or she does not have the exact skill set desired, it would be prudent to still consider that person for the position.

Of course, as an example, if you are hiring a Search Engine Optimization Specialist and the candidate has never worked with computers, that would be too much of a stretch. However, if you want a candidate who can type 80 words per minute, you should not exclude the perfect candidate because he or she can only type 65 words per minute. A great personality and a high level of motivation will ultimately mean more than those 15 words per minute. A magnetic organization should offer training for employees to improve their skill sets anyway. New employees’ skills should be developed through training initiatives, regardless of their proficiency level. If you try to develop character in training sessions, good luck to you.

In summary and your Call to Action: Skills can be taught, character cannot. Evaluate your Recruiting Process for valuing character and attitude over technical skills and aptitude. Online retail giant Zappos made this famous by actually having two separate interview teams, one for attitude and the other for aptitude.

Call to Action #2: Ensure that you are using the right behavioral questions to assess each candidate’s Cultural Fit with your organization.

 

As 2015 winds down, we can expect a new word of the year soon. But that doesn’t mean we can forget about the power of Culture.

 

Kevin Sheridan is an Internationally-recognized Key-Note Speaker, a New York Times Best Selling Author, and one of the most sought-after voices in the world on the topic of employee engagement. He spent thirty years as a high-level Human Capital Management consultant, helping some of the world’s largest corporations rebuild a culture that fosters productive engagement, earning him several distinctive awards and honors. Kevin’s premier creation, PEER®, has been consistently recognized as a long- overdue, industry-changing innovation in the field of Employee Engagement. His book, “Building a Magnetic Culture,” made six of the best seller lists including The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and USA Today. He is also the author of The Virtual Manager, which explores how to most effectively manage remote workers.

deleteKevin received a Master of Business Administration from the Harvard Business School in 1988, concentrating his degree in Strategy, Human Resources Management, and Organizational Behavior. He is also a serial entrepreneur, having founded and sold three different companies.

Twitter
LinkedIn
Email: kevin@kevinsheridanllc.com

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business psychology, Company Culture, Danny Gattas, Employee Engagement, Employment, Event, Labor, Labor Laws, Memphis

Learn How Proposed Overtime Rule Changes could Change your Business Forever


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The Department of Labor has dramatically increased the number of employees who must be paid on an hourly basis. This change forces employers to consider the implications in employee compensation such as

  • Will cause millions of employees who have been classified as exempt to become non-exempt, and be paid on an hourly basis
  • Will there also be a change to the duties text for exempt employees
  • Will the DOL adopt the new threshold, or will the department implement a different standard

Due to recent and proposed changes to Federal labor laws, HRO Partners is hosting an educational event to explore the implications of these proposed changes. So, please join us on September 30th between 8am-10am, at the Great Hall and Conference Center (Link in Google Maps).

Employers of all sizes must be aware and prepared for these sweeping changes.

Our esteemed panel of experts will include:

  • Cynthia Thompson – Publisher & Editor, HR Professionals Magazine
  • Jonathan Hancock – Labor & Employment attorney, Baker Donelson
  • Whitney Harmon – Labor & Employment attorney, Baker Doneslon
  • Mario Musarra – Compensation Manager, TruGreen

Special keynote by Jonathan Hancock, Labor & Employment attorney with Baker Donelson.

To register for the event or to learn more please visit this page.

For more information, please email support@hro-partners.com or contact Katelyn Tusky at 901-737-0123

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Uncategorized

Make Bottom Line Business Sense- Judy Tuesdays


Judy Tuesdays are back. Click here Businesswoman receiving an award.to visit Judy Bell Consulting’s page.

Make Bottom Line Business Sense

In previous blogs, we have looked at EQ in many ways, especially as it relates to healthy and happy relationships- both at work and at home.
Researchers have confirmed what Human Resource professionals have known for quite some time. One’s level of emotional intelligence is a great predictor of success at work as well as a measurement of healthy and productive relationships and leadership abilities.

EQ is not touchy-feely or happy-go-lucky “stuff”. EQ is about healthy and productive relationships. And healthy and productive relationships mean better customer service, improved employee relations, and better company profits.

Higher EQ levels equate to…

  • Enhanced listening
  • Increase in positive and productive communication
  • Increased teamwork
  • Increased customer satisfaction
  • Better problem solving
  • Productivity gains
  • Higher employee achievement orientation

Also important… enhanced EQ levels mean…download (1)

  • Less costly mistakes in orders and production
  • Turnover decreases
  • Employee attendance improves
  • Workers’ Compensation claims are lower

“Because of the furious pace of change in business today, difficult to manage relationships sabotage more business than anything else…it is not a question of strategy that gets us in trouble; it is a question of emotions.” – John Kotter, Harvard Business School

Written by the lovely Judy Bell.

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Start Co, Start-up, Tech

Troopto: A Group Funding Platform for Workplace Gifts


Recently I sat down with Andrew Goei, founder of a group funding Start-up called Troopto. During our interview we discussed Troopto’s business model and Andrew’s unique outlook on business that has shaped his organization. This is the first of a two part blog series that will highlight Troopto and then describe my interview with Andrew. 

What is Troobar_graph_conference_400_clr_5943pto you might ask? Well imagine this scenario. It is a co-worker’s birthday and the entire office has decided to celebrate the occasion by pitching in to purchase a gift-card and house an in-office celebration. The only problem is collecting the funds. It isn’t that people don’t want to contribute, rather it is people don’t have cash on them, work remotely, or are even out on vacation. So the funds don’t get collected and the aforementioned birthday bash never comes to light all because there isn’t an easier way to pool office funds together. Well Troopto, a start-up and recent graduate from Memphis’ Start Co accelerator, has the solution.

The idea behind Troopto is a group funding website specifically designed for workplace gifts and collaborative Troopto logofunding. This platform can also be used for various crowd sourcing functions such as pledge drives for Greek life, paying your fantasy football dues, your best friends surprise party,  or whatever your group funding needs may be.

Troopto’s commitment to working tirelessly, bringing their clients the most simple and user friendly product sets them apart from products offering similar services. The site’s simple interface and unique features create a user-centric experience that anyone can use. Currently they are in their private beta phase and are looking to expose their product to HR and office managers alike.

For further information please visit Troopto and stay posted for our second blog piece coming out next week.

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Company Culture, Judy Bell Tuesdays

Organizational Values Drive Culture


Below is a copy of a blog from Judy Bell at Judy Bell Consulting 

“Does your company have a set of clearly defined and clearly stated values? If not, now is the time to determine, define and declare your values. As you begin the process, keep in mind that companies don’t have values. The employedownload (1)es inside the company…at all levels… have the values. Values that are determined by the employees and communicated regularly are the ones that begin to take root and ultimately become your culture.

Executive and employee alignment with the values is an integral part of a positive and healthy culture. Everyone must “walk the talk” of the values each day for all to see. How employees view the culture inside an organization ultimately determines the company’s brand, positively or negatively. It can be said that, “Culture is the internal brand that ultimately affects the external brand of the company, its services and its products.” Judy W. Bell

Let us help you define your values. We have leadership and management expertise to help develop the values that will positively impact your internal culture.”

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Company Culture, Judy Bell Tuesdays

Organizational Values Drive Culture


Below is a copy of a blog from Judy Bell at Judy Bell Consulting 

“Does your company have a set of clearly defined and clearly stated values? If not, now is the time to determine, define and declare your values. As you begin the process, keep in mind that companies don’t have values. The employedownload (1)es inside the company…at all levels… have the values. Values that are determined by the employees and communicated regularly are the ones that begin to take root and ultimately become your culture.

Executive and employee alignment with the values is an integral part of a positive and healthy culture. Everyone must “walk the talk” of the values each day for all to see. How employees view the culture inside an organization ultimately determines the company’s brand, positively or negatively. It can be said that, “Culture is the internal brand that ultimately affects the external brand of the company, its services and its products.” Judy W. Bell

Let us help you define your values. We have leadership and management expertise to help develop the values that will positively impact your internal culture.”

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Employee Engagement

“First Break all the Rules” to Get your Employees Engaged


51lEgKNNeWLHere at HRO Partners, we frequently herald the importance of promoting an engaging workplace and cohesive culture at your organization because we are committed to the idea that having engaged employees is indicative to your success. Much of our beliefs are based on Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman’s book “First Break All the Rules: What the World’s Greatest Managers Do Differently.”

In their book they interview managers from an eclectic set of industries and from all across the world in search of what makes other managers more successful. They learn that each manager should embrace their personal strengths and treat their employees with empathy. However, in their search of what makes managers distinguishable from good to great, they uncovered something very interesting. They discovered that employee engagement is one of the most overlooked variables compromising businesses’ success. Organizations have been overlooking a variable that  costs American businesses 300 billion dollars annually and that 70% of American employees are described as disengaged. Our authors created a short, simple, and quick set of questions that measures employee engagement and distributed these questions to millions of employees in organizations all over the world. Their results supported the idea that organizations with highly engaged employees performed better than those who reported high levels of disengaged employees.

 Marcus and Curt discuss what managers can do to create an engaging workplace environment and came up with 4 keys things that great manager’s do that separates them from the rest of the herd.

Continue reading

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